Cornucopia Traditions – Alive and Well in Victoria

Written by Harold McNeill on April 21st, 2011. Posted in Adventure


Jamie, Kia and Liala

Traditions

Jamie and Kia Charko

 April 16, 2011

 

The matt upon which Jamie and Kia were married has been in the Simonsen family for over 300 years. During this time dozens of family members have been married. Here their daughter, Liala, shares in the celebration.

Cornucopia Cake: The Cornucopia (korn-yoo-KO-pee-uh) symbol stretches across many cultures and peoples from Ancient Greece to modern day. That it is part of many wedding celebrations is only natural.

Norway and Denmark:Cake

The Kransekake (literally ‘ring cake’) is a traditional dessert, usually eaten on special occasions such at weddings, baptisms, Christmas or New Year’s Eve.  The ideal Kransekake, made with almonds, sugar and egg whites (marzipan), is hard to touch, yet soft and chewy.

The original variant used at weddings is called Overflodighedshorn (Horn of Abundance) and is shaped like a horn and is filled with chocolates, cookies, and other small treats.

Native American Culture:

Within North American Native culture, similar traditions prevailed. More recently the author and widely regarded spiritual leader, Joseph Rael (Tslew-the-koveh) while leading a dance in Australia had a vision of a Horn of Plenty in the sky pouring blessings on the Earth.  The message of the Horn of Plenty is that we humans have fooled around long enough and God is going to take over.  If we focus upon peace, we will get peace.

Canadian Cultural Roots

Thanksgiving (a celebration that originated in Canada) dates back to the first European settlers who filled a curved goat’s horn with fruit and grain in celebration of the harvest season. Martin Frobisher (1578), in what is now Newfoundland, began the celebration and it was soon followed by the Pilgrims (1671) in what is now the United States. The French Settlers, following on the lead of Samuel de Champlain, expanded the celebration and named it the Order of Good Cheer. It became a shared celebration with the Native Indians.

Love from the McNeill Family

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Comments

  • Herb Craig

    December 14, 2021 |

    As always awesome job Harold. It seems whatever you do in life the end result is always the same professional, accurate, inclusive and entertaining. You have always been a class act and a great fellow policeman to work with. We had some awesome times together my friend. I will always hold you close as a true friend. Keep up the good work. Hope to see you this summer.
    Warm regards
    Herb Craig

  • Harold McNeill

    November 26, 2021 |

    Hi Dorthy, So glad you found those stories and, yes, they hold many fond memories. Thanks to social media and the blog, I’ve been able to get in touch with many friends from back in the day. Cheers, Harold

  • Harold McNeill

    November 26, 2021 |

    Well, well. Pleased to see your name pop up. I’m in regular contact via FB with many ‘kids’ from back in our HS days (Guy, Dawna, Shirley and others). Also, a lot of Cold Lake friends through FB. Cheers, Harold

  • Harold McNeill

    November 26, 2021 |

    Oh, that is many years back and glad you found the story. I don’t have any recall of others in my class other than the Murphy sisters on whose farm my Dad and Mom worked.

  • Harold McNeill

    November 26, 2021 |

    Pleased to hear from you Howie and trust all is going well. As with you, I have a couple of sad stories of times in my police career when I crossed paths with Ross Barrington Elworthy. Just haven’t had the time to write those stories.

  • Howie Siegel

    November 25, 2021 |

    My only fight at Pagliacci’s was a late Sunday night in 1980 (?) He ripped the towel machine off the bathroom wall which brought me running. He came after me, I grabbed a chair and cracked him on the head which split his skull and dropped him. I worried about the police finding him on the floor. I had just arrived from Lasqueti Island and wasn’t convinced the police were my friends. I dragged him out to Broad and Fort and left him on the sidewalk, called the cops. They picked him up and he never saw freedom again (as far as I know). I found out it was Ross Elworthy.

  • Herbert Plain

    November 24, 2021 |

    Just read you article on Pibroch excellent. My Dad was Searle Grain company agent we move there in 1942/3 live in town by the hall for 5 years than moved one mile east to the farm on the corner where the Pibroch road meets Hwy 44. Brother Don still lives there. I went to school with you and Louise.

  • Herbert Plain

    November 24, 2021 |

    Just read your life account of Pibroch excellent.
    My family mowed to Pibroch in 1942 Dad was grain buyer for Searle Grain Company lived in town for 5 years than mowed one mile East to the farm on the corner of the road from Pibroch and Hwy 44. Bro Don still lives there.I went to school with both you and Louise.

  • DOROTHY MARSHALL

    November 15, 2021 |

    These stories brought back some sweet memories for me. a wonderful trip down memory lane . the photos were great. It has made me miss those days.

  • DOROTHY MARSHALL

    November 15, 2021 |

    Enjoyed your story Harold Dorothy Hartman