Harlan: The Old School House – Chapter 1 of 6

Written by Harold McNeill on September 2nd, 2010. Posted in Family 1940 1965


harlan-school-harlan-sk.-1949

Photo (from Web): The  Harlan Shool House sits today as it did in the ’20s,’30s and ’40s. That could easily be my cousin Stan and I standing by the school.

Link to Next Post: Interesting History
Link to Last Post: A Final Farewell  (The last of Part III)
Link to Family Stories Index

Early Spring, 1949

We arrived at the school early that morning, but dad stayed in the car. Getting the kids enrolled was a job better suited to women and mom seldom choose to question dad’s decisions. As for me, there was no question I was more than a little scared, as I had never before set foot inside a schoolroom. All the kids at the school had been in class since last fall, were nearly finished for the year and were looking forward to the summer holidays. Other than Betty and Stan, Louise and I did not know a single person.

Five minutes later, my worst nightmare came to pass. I was assigned to Grade 1. “What in hell did I do to deserve this?” I am eight years old and they are putting me Grade 1 with all these little kids, even with my baby sister and she is not even supposed to be going to school yet.” This was definitely unfair.

The only thing that salvaged the situation was the fact that all Grade 1 and 2 students sat in one row, Grade 3 and 4, the next, 5 and 6, the third and so on all the way to the five or so senior students who occupied the last row. In total, no more than twenty students and one teacher.

Miss Hardnose, I don’t remember her name, took turns teaching the students row by row. Stan was in my row, but in Grade 2, and Betty, a couple of rows over, closer to the windows of course, in grade 5 or 6. She was always such a smarty pants!

Mom patiently explained to the teacher that while I had not completed all the formal curriculum in Alberta, she had been teaching me all the requirements for Grade 1, 2 and 3 for the past three years. The teacher remained skeptical.

Mom politely asked: “I wish you would just give Harold a few tests. I think you’ll find he really does have his basic reading, writing and math down pat. He is certainly well past the grade one level.”

Without further adieu, Miss Hardnose responded:  “I’m sorry Mrs. McNeill; we must strive to maintain high standards here in Saskatchewan and in the past we have found students from Alberta are seldom able to meet those standards. The rules direct that your son start in Grade 1. If you had some documentation from Alberta, that would have been most helpful, but I can assure you I will watch his work very closely and see how he progresses.”

“Watch his work very closely, watch his work very closely? That sounded more like a threat than a promise to help. This was not going to be an easy two months.

Miss Hardnose got up, excused herself and went about other business making it clear there was no room for further discussion. The only concession she had made was to allow Louise to attend the Grade 1 class even though she was not due to start school until that fall.

“Well mom, that didn’t go very well did it?”  I stated as we left the school and returned to the car where dad was waiting. Mom told me I simply had to work hard to prove myself. I agreed, but thought I should have used one or two of the terms Uncle Tonnie and Cousin Reggie had taught me to explain my feelings. That teach Miss know-it-all, a lesson she would not soon forget. Dad was also upset and was going to go in and ‘explain’ the facts of life, but mom was able to dissuade him. Getting kicked out of Grade 1 on the first day of school would not look good on my record.

Our reason for being at this school is simple. Dad and mom were headed out to southern Alberta to work on road construction and had arranged for Louise and me to stay with Aunt Liz and Uncle Warren on their farm in Harlan as Betty and Stan were already attending the same school.

On the trip over, and for the several days in Cold Lake, I had been sullen and withdrawn after having had to leave my buddy Shep at Marie Lake. I knew Mr. Goodrich would take good care of him, but the pain of leaving him behind was almost more than I could bear. Going to a new home, to school for the first time and having Miss Hardnose for my first teacher, did not help.

There was an up side however, that was coming to live with Aunt Liz and Uncle Warren. We would again be with cousins Stan and Betty with whom we had become such close friends while living at the Smith Place three years earlier. Besides, Uncle Warren was a happy go lucky guy and Aunt Liz, although more strict than Uncle Warren, was a wonderful person who always treated Louise and me as one of her own – spankings and all.

A day or two after our arrival, dad, mom and Aunt Irene, who was traveling with them, were getting ready to hit the road for southern Alberta. After eight years for me, and five for Louise, of being so close to mom and dad in isolated areas of Saskatchewan and Alberta, it was a painful, tearful parting. I cannot imagine how hard it must have been for mom to leave behind her two little kids behind, not knowing when she might see them again. We hugged, kissed, waved good-bye and they were off in a cloud of good old Saskatchewan dust.

Louise and I settled in much quicker than expected and were even able to adapt to the regular routines of school. Although I was more used to working at my own pace, I found it great fun having a lot of other kids around to play with. Ms. Hardnose held fast to the rules which stated I had to complete the Grade 1 before moving on, but it appeared she was gradually beginning to warm to my winning ways.

One day I started talking to her about our lives living in the bush – fishing, trapping, running a mink ranch and other things that Louise and I had done. She slowly became interested and, I think, by the end of school year she even liked me a little bit. I was really glad I did what mom had encouraged me to do and, I guess, I needed to prove that just because we were from Alberta, did not mean that we were stupid, after all, we had both been born in Saskatchewan and that should count for something.

It was not long before she granted that I could actually spell, read, do math and short passages that were at least as good as most Grade 1, except, that is, for my baby sister.  Louise, the diligent little soul she was, and who was not even supposed to be starting school, was already well beyond the rest of the kids in our Grade 1 class.

Then, just as school was ending, came the shocker. Mom came with me on the last day to speak with Miss Hardnose who explained that as I still had not completed the full Grade 1 curriculum she could not advance me to Grade 2.  Mom was really upset but nothing she said could get the teacher to change her mind.

In September, only a few months from my ninth birthday, I would again be starting Grade 1 with my little sister who was not yet 6. At this rate I was on tract to finish high school sometime in my late twenties – which, as it turned out, was not going to be far from the mark.

Harold McNeill

Link to Next Post: Interesting History
Link to Last Post: A Final Farewell  (The last of Part III)
Link to Family Stories Index

(2016)

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Comments

  • McNeill Life Stories How to Game an Election - McNeill Life Stories

    September 18, 2019 |

    […] The Federal Conservatives and Seymour Riding Association complied but one day later those memes will be shared by every third party social media site and by thousands of supporters where the message will be taken as a statements of the fact.  Five years from now those memes will still be circulating. (Link here to background on the SNC Lavalin matter) […]

  • Harold McNeill

    August 21, 2019 |

    For those who followed the earlier post about the cost of ICBC Auto insurance coverage in British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba (linked in comments) here is another follow-up article.

    This article again confirms earlier assertions that public-private insurers such as that which ICBC provides, is among the best in Canada in terms of rates and coverage. A link is provided in the original story.

  • Harold McNeill

    August 16, 2019 |

    Many thanks for reviewing the article Elizabeth. There are so many areas of our society in which populism carries the day, although I think what is happening with the ICBC is that groups having a vested interest in private insurance would dearly love to dislodge ICBC from their preferred position. That being said, I think was a good move to have only portions of the insurance coverage in BC being held by ICBC and other portions being made available through private enterprise.

  • Elizabeth Mary McInnes, CAIB

    August 15, 2019 |

    It’s a breath of fresh air to see a resident of British Columbia look to review all the facts over believing what is reported in the news or just following along with the negative stigma of the masses. Your article truly showcases that with a little reform to ICBC’s provincial system – British Columbia could be a true leader for other provinces in Canada. Very well written article!

  • Harold McNeill

    August 13, 2019 |

    August 13, 2019. The Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), a private enterprise group not unlike the Fraser Institute, is again on the campaign trail. They state ICBC rates are the highest in Canada, but, thankfully, Global BC inserted a section indicating the Insurance Bureau cherry-picked the highest number in BC and the lowest numbers in AB, ON and other Eastern Provinces. If you take a few minutes to check reliable sources you will find BC rates, are the lowest in Canada.

  • Andrew Dunn

    May 14, 2019 |

    Thank you so much for all your help thus far Harold, aka. Tractor guy! I could not have done without you!

  • Harold McNeill

    April 25, 2019 |

    I find it interesting to contemplate how a small community evolves in general isolation from the rest of the world. We have a similar situation in the northern communities in Canada to which access is limited. The inclusion of the world wide web and mass media has changed things, but these communities are still left pretty much to their own devices when it comes to personal interaction.

  • Harold McNeill

    March 19, 2019 |

    Hi Dave. Not that I am aware and I have a fairly comprehensive family tree for the McNeill side of the family. I will pull it up and scan. Cheers, Harold. Great chatting with you and I will give Ben a nudge.

  • Dave Cassels

    March 16, 2019 |

    Were you related to Guy McNeill who owned the Bruin Inn in St. Albert in the late 40’s or early 50’s? Guy was a close friend of my father-in-law who was the first President of the Royal Glenora Club. My phone number is 780 940 1175. Thank you.

  • Harold McNeill

    March 15, 2019 |

    So glad you found the story and enjoyed. Indeed, they were memorable times. I did a fair amount of searching but never managed to contact any of the Murffit kids. However, it was neat to make contact with the Colony and someone I knew from back in the day. I have enjoyed writing these stories from back in the 1940s and 50s and have made contact with a lot of friends from those early years. I will give you a call over the weekend. Cheers, Harold