Climate Change: Ground Zero

Written by Harold McNeill on January 19th, 2018. Posted in Tim Hortons Morning Posts, Travelogue


Cape Drougt 1
Climate Change, Ground Zero: April 21, 2018
The day the taps will be turned off in Cape Town, South Africa.
(Photo album of Cape Town)
(Jan 28, 131)

As we arrive in Cape Town, South Africa, a Metropolitan area of 3.7 million, a large sign at our airport advised the city was experiencing a severe drought and while the sign urged us to Cape Town Signconserve, the welcoming nature of the sign did not impart the notion of just how critical the situation had become.

Photo: This was the sign. Perhaps a photo of the Cape Reservoir (above), along with a hard message might have had more impact of just how critical things are now, not years from now.

At our hotel, we were casually spoken to about conserving but, again, it was a weak message. We drank, brushed our teeth, washed, showered and used toilet facilities as per our Canadian routines. We tried to reuse towels, but more often than not new ones replaced those once-used towels that hung on the shower rod.

After using public facilities, we rinsed our hands under an open tap and left half glasses or partially consumed bottles of water on the table. Why? Well, we are Canadian, and we’ve never really had to think much about our water use habits.

Water CansOn average, Canadians use 251 litres of water per person per day. In Cape Town, they use 87 litres per day and as of February 1, 2018, will be restricted to 50 litres per day. Even as we tour, we have no idea the city is well beyond the point of being able to correct the situation and serve the population. Coming April 1, 2018, the taps will be shut off and residents will be restricted to 25 litres per day.

Collage: Canada vs Cape Town water use as represented by these 25-litre containers. On average, every person in Canada uses ten per day — in Cape Town, just one until that supply runs out.

To access water, Capetonians will need to line up at local distribution points each of which will serve 20,000 people. Only hospitals and other emergency facilities will remain open as schools, and other public facilities will be shut down. I cannot imagine how the tourist industry will survive. Why did this happen?

In the past, the weather in Cape Town was much like that of Victoria, only reversed from here and somewhat warmer. The winter rains provided welcome relief from the summer heat, and those rains filled the reservoirs to capacity. You can see the normal high water mark on the columns in the lead photo.

Remember ten or fifteen years ago when the reservoirs in Victoria began to dry up in late summer? We simply increased the size of our reservoirs to retain more of that precious winter water. That will do no good in Cape Town, as over the past two years, the rains have stopped coming.

Now, in the second year of the most severe drought in its history, there is no sign of relief and what water is left is disappearing fast. It is a crisis of massive proportions, and today the police and military are making contingency plans for controlling crowds when people begin lining up for their 25 litres per day. How will this end?

In short, no one knows, but one could guess the infrastructure of the city is in danger of collapsing.  I wondered if this was just fear mongering, but a friend Dee, from Cape Town, stated in my FB post yesterday: “Yes it’s very bad. From 1 Feb we are only allowed 50liters of water a day. In April no more water… 😓”  Dee, a vibrant young woman who was our tour guide, is expecting her second child within the next few months.

I understand plans are being made for desalination plants, and some water will obviously be transported in, but that will still leave a massive shortfall. The planning has come too little, too late for the Cape and their experience might soon spread to other major cities around the world.

Think of Los Angeles, a city of 13,000,000 built in a desert area never intended as a massive population centre. In that city, citizens consume 230 litres per day, about the same as Canadians, yet in doing so, they face a future, not unlike Cape Owens LakeTown. Like dozens of other major cities around the world, LA has no plans as to how they will deal with this approaching catastrophe.

In the last century, LA built the giant Aqueduct, water from the Owens River in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains but in the process drained Owen Lake (photo right). It served the cities needs in the last century, but in the face of unrestrained development, they also drained the rivers and streams that fed the lake. During LA’s quest for water, they killed off small towns, large populations of wildlife and turned thousands of square kilometers of land into a dust-filled desert. Los Angeles and Cape Town could soon be sister cities.

When Australia (Melbourne and other areas) was facing a similar challenge in 2009 when we visited, they were well along the path of developing alternative sources of water including desalination plants. (Link). Not so Cape Town or Las Angeles.

Some scoff at the idea of climate change as having led to these challenges, but perhaps Cape Town (this year) and Los Angeles (in the near future) are canaries in the environmental cage. If one or both collapse because of a lack of water, we had better pay attention even if they are able to pull back from the brink. Whether it’s climate change or human stupidity (probably a good measure of both), we need to change our ways and we need to prepare for the future in a more responsible way. I think we can, but it will take a herculean effort and we need all levels of government and business to help pave the way.

Paying attention to the death of canaries in a cage saved thousands of coal miners in past centuries by providing them with an early warning of danger. Cape Town, Los Angeles and other areas of the world are providing those warnings to the world today.

canary_coal_mine
We need pay attention and we need to help in leading the way even though we in Canada seem to have an unlimited supply of water.

Harold McNeill

Link here to the Globe and Mail Article which lead me to write this article.

 

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    […] Maxime Bernier, a leading contender in the Conservative race is calling for a “wall to be built along the border and claims that if he becomes the next Prime Minister he will force the Americans to pay for the building of that wall. (Border Security Gone Crazy) […]

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    […] If you happen to support Bill C-51, a bill that is related solely to ‘terrorism’ and, perhaps, support an even more invasive laws being included, what would you think about the entire Bill (present and proposed) being folded back into the Criminal Code and made applicable to every Canadian?  Would that give our police to much power to simply bypass checks and balances developed over the past 150 years. (Oversight) […]

  • Maurice Smook

    August 13, 2016 |

    Hi Jillian,

    I don’t know if you are still checking this site but I had to respond again. February of 2017 it will be 72 years since this battle occurred.

    What caught my attention about this incident was on the Go Deep Documentary that aired on the History Channel. First of all I never known that this battle having ever occurred.

    According to my grade 3 teacher WW2 had never occurred. That grade 3 teacher stated that the WW2 and the holocaust was all propaganda. All of my classmates they believed her. I hate to say this but all I knew was that soldiers shooting at each other.

    I almost was expelled from school. My

    Mom my Dad my brother and my Uncle would have been arrested for propaganda. I paid the price. It was ironic a grade 5 teacher told me that Smooks are all commies. Dad was Conservative.

    All the Smooks that I known are all Conservative. If I had the money I would have loved to sue those two teachers.

    As I said I never heard of this Battle. If it were not for that program I would have never had known.

    I started to do more researching to find out more about the history of this battle. The narrator of Go Deep mentioned the names of the pilots who died that battle.

    I missed 20 minutes of that program but the camera crew had the camera’s pointed towards the sign with the names of the deceits. That is how I known.

    According to the narrator There are three who are still missing. W.J. Jackson, Harry Smook and A. Duckworth. A couple of months ago the staff of Go Deep have located Harry and A. Duckworths aircraft. This is on you tube. Harry and A. Duckworth craft is approx 650 feet deep in the Fjord. The individual who is heading this expansionary mission made it known he will not rest until all three of the missing pilots
    will be retrieved. I am sure that A. Duckworth’s kin are hoping for the same.

    What really puzzles me is that I have sent emails to the Smooks. Not one ever replying. I presume its the same with you. Sad. Dad rarely spoke about his family. It appears there is a big secret of the Smooks. I too assume Harry is a kin to my Dad. Harry maybe a 4th 5th cousin to my Dad. I too would like to know. Harry and A. Duckworth served and died for our country. The other is W.j. Jackson – who is also still missing – having died for our Country.

    In conclusion I still ask myself why is this a huge secret.

    If you are still checking this site please contact me. Maybe we may be kin.

    Take care.

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    […] More amazing still is that many of those I met are now living and working in communities in or near cities and towns where I spent much of my early life (e.g. Vermillion, Turtleford, Westlock, Edmonton, etc.) For that matter one family from Edmonton lives no more than a stones throw from the home in which my family lived in 1949 at 12237, 95th Street, a time when Edmonton boasted a population of 137,000 and our home was on the very west edge of the city. Today the next block contains the Yellow Head Highway. Link: https://www.mcneillifestories.com/mcneill-family-edmonton/ […]

  • Valerie Heuman (Roddick)

    June 19, 2016 |

    Having just returned to the Okanagan Valley from a weekend in Pibroch, I am delighted to have stumbled on your blog to see the picture of the main street. My aunt and uncle Peggy & Gordon McGillvery owned and lived in the old Post Office on the North east corner of the main intersection and my brother Adrian currently lives south a bit backing on the School yard. We are Sheila’s cousins and still have a close connection to the town.

  • Sheila(Roddick) Allison

    May 19, 2016 |

    Hi. So fun to find your blog. I remember going to school with you and Louise. I loved my childhood in Pibroch which incidentally was named by my grandfather Aaron Roddick. I will never forget the night the garage burned down. Nice to see the landmark photo before the big fire!

  • George Dahl

    April 12, 2016 |

    What a great site. I’m trying to locate a woman named Sally Jennifer who was from the Cold Lake area back in the early sixties. I met her when I was stationed at Namao air base in Edmonton. I was serving with the USAF 3955 air refueling squadron from rhe fall 1963 till the spring of 64. Sally was 22 at the time I was 21. Sally was my first love. I had orders to ship out to South East Asia and we lost contact after that.
    If any of you know the where abouts of Sally I would like to get reacquainted with her. She is First Nation, Blackfoot I believe. She is Catholic and may have attended a Catholic school in Cold Lake.
    Thank You in advance, George Dahl

  • dave armit

    March 23, 2016 |

    good old fashioned police work done by good old fashioned policemen……….in regards to mr cain..i learned a few years ago that he was born on the same day in the same hospital that i was..my father was a close friend of the cain family…!!! interesting..d a

  • Joyce McMenamon

    March 1, 2016 |

    Haha, love it! We should probably eat rats and rabbits rather than beef. Also I’ve noticed that there are a lot less pests where dogs are not kept on leashes.

  • Kari

    February 27, 2016 |

    Thanks for a wonderful trip down memory lane Dad!!! That was an amazing trip and I am so glad that we had the opportunity to share that experience together!
    ❤️